Frequently Asked Questions

Get answers to some of our most frequently asked questions.

Where are Checkups treats made?

Checkups treats are made in our plant in Missouri.  No matter where you buy Checkups treats, they were made in this plant.

What does it mean that plaque was reduced by 25% and tartar by 62%?

To obtain the prestigious Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) seal of acceptance, a study had to be performed on these treats to prove that they really did work to keep the teeth free from plaque and tartar. The study compared the amounts of plaque and tartar on the teeth of dogs who had been eating these treats compared with dogs that were not eating the treats. The VOHC has very specific guidelines for running these studies and you can learn more by visiting their website.

When the results were compared, the levels of plaque and tartar on the teeth of dogs eating the Checkups treats were significantly lower than the levels on the control dogs’ teeth. Tartar is the hardened compound that must be removed from the teeth by dental prophylaxis. Reducing the tartar on the teeth by almost 2/3 is amazing! This indicates that the regular use of these treats is going to prevent a buildup of this nasty substance. Plaque is what turns into tartar if it is not removed from the tooth in a timely manner. Reducing the plaque on the surface of the teeth by 25% corresponded with the 62% drop in tartar formation. Because plaque forms so quickly, it is impossible to reduce the plaque on the teeth as much as the tartar. That is why the numbers differ so much.

As with any statistics, it is important to look at the big picture, which is your dog’s mouth. Preventing tartar buildup on the teeth will delay time between dental cleanings in your veterinarian’s office. This saves you money and prevents your dog from having to undergo frequent anesthesia. Keeping the teeth clean also keeps your pet happier and healthier. Read more about the consequences of dental disease in our pet care articles and our other FAQ’s.

How many treats should I feed to my dog?

If your dog weighs between 20 and 25 pounds, feed 1/2 of a treat once or twice daily. You can easily divide the treat at the score line in the center of the bone. If your dog weighs more than 25 pounds, feed 1 treat once or twice daily. Make sure that your dog adequately chews the treat and does not swallow large chunks, which can lead to choking.

My Dog Likes These Treats So Much, He Ate The Entire Bag At Once. SHOULD I BE CONCERNED?

These treats are all natural and pose no risk of toxicity when consumed in large quantities. The titanium mineral may cause your dog’s feces to appear white and the glycerin may have a laxative affect leading to diarrhea. As with overconsumption of any treats, digestive upset may occur in some dogs. If vomiting becomes frequent or diarrhea develops blood, pets can become dehydrated and may require veterinary intervention.

How do these treats actually keep my dog’s teeth clean?

After many experimental formulations, the ideal combination of ingredients led to these treats. This recipe is soluble and highly digestible, making it safe for your dogs. This was an important priority, but the other priority was to make a pliable texture that would allow the teeth to sink in, effectively scraping the surfaces to remove plaque. When dogs chew the treat, they will remove existing plaque from the surface. This is important to prevent the build-up of tartar. Plaque turns into tartar when it is allowed to stay on the surface of the teeth by binding with minerals in the saliva. Mechanical action is the most important way these treats keep the teeth clean.

What are the best methods for caring for my dog’s teeth?

Brushing the teeth is the best method that you have for keeping your dog’s teeth bright and shiny. Most puppies will allow their teeth to be brushed regularly to remove plaque before it turns to tartar. Pet dental kits are available to make teeth brushing easier. Do not use your own toothpaste, because the foaming agent can cause stomach upset in your pet.

Many pet owners do not have the time for daily brushing of their dog’s teeth. An alternative to daily brushing would be a treat, like Checkups™. Checkups are pliable and completely dissolvable dental hygiene treats for your dog.

How can I help prevent dental disease throughout my dog’s life?

Dental disease is the most commonly diagnosed disorder in veterinary practices in dogs in the United States. Most will have dental disease by the time they are 2 years old. The best way to prevent your dog from developing dental disease as they get older is to formulate a program of dental care that starts when your pet is young.
Regular brushing (5-7 times per week), regular use of dental treats like Checkups*, as well as regular veterinary care, including dental exams, will help maintain good dental health.

*We do not recommend feeding Checkups to puppies less than 6 months of age or puppies or adult dogs weighing less than 20 pounds.

What should I do early on to care for my dog’s dental health?

Puppies are born with baby teeth that are replaced with permanent teeth at about 12 weeks of age. Your veterinarian should examine your puppy’s mouth at every check-up to make sure that their deciduous teeth (baby teeth) are being replaced normally. Most of the time owners do not notice when their pets lose the baby teeth because the teeth are either swallowed or lost in the environment.

If an adult tooth comes in and the baby tooth doesn’t fall out (a retained deciduous tooth) the deciduous tooth can cause problems for the health of the adult tooth. Retained deciduous teeth are commonly removed while your puppy or kitten is anesthetized for spay or neuter surgery.

What causes gingivitis?

Visible tartar on the surface of the tooth is only part of the problem. If you can see the tartar, it is also on the surface of the tooth under the gum (where you can’t see it). If the gums are red along the edge of the tooth, this is a symptom of gingivitis (inflammation of the gums). This is what starts the process of gingivitis. Gingivitis can be treated with veterinary care.

The more advanced disease called periodontitis is permanent. At this point, the structures supporting the teeth have been damaged and control is all that is possible. Prolonged dental disease makes these serious health concerns all the more likely, while increasing the chance of your pet losing teeth.

What does it mean if my dog has bad breath?

This may be a sign of dental disease. All pets have a distinct odor to their breath, affected by what they eat. This should not be a foul or offensive odor, though. If it is, there may be some underlying dental disease acting as the culprit. Look at your pet’s mouth. If you see a yellow, orange, or brownish material stuck to the surface of the teeth, you are most likely looking at tartar.

What is the best way to store my pet food?

Our foods remain freshest when stored in a cool, dry location. The food can be stored in the bag, but make sure to protect it from pests that may be attracted to the food (or hungry pets that may take an extra meal). Many customers choose to dump the food into a bin or container. This is certainly a reasonable way to store the food, but make sure to follow these simple steps:

1. Finish all of the food from one bag before adding another bag into the bin. If you have a small amount left, you can transfer it to a plastic bag so that you can proceed to step #2.
2. Wash the bin with hot, soapy water and dry thoroughly before adding a new bag of food.
3. Cut out the production code and “best before” information from the bag and tape it to the top of the bin so that if you have any questions or concerns, you can provide this information to the customer support department.
4. Store the bin in a cool, dry location. Extreme heat can cause the food to spoil and excessive moisture can lead to mold growth in the bin.

What is the big deal about dental health?

The big deal about keeping your dog’s mouth clean and healthy is the importance this plays to overall good health. The mouth contains a large blood supply that is very close to the surface. When the teeth have plaque or tartar on the surface, the gums become inflamed. This inflammation can lead to small areas of bleeding, which in turn allows the bacteria from the mouth easy access into the bloodstream. If this is happening frequently, or on a large scale, it will overwhelm the body’s ability to destroy the bacteria. These bacteria can then end up in important organs such as the heart, liver or kidneys. Infections in these critical organs can lead to one very sick dog. Permanent damage can be done to these organs, requiring expensive care throughout the life of your pet. Keep your pet’s mouth clean and you will help him stay happy and healthy.

Frequently Asked Questions

Get answers to some of our most frequently asked questions.

Where are Checkups treats made?

Checkups treats are made in our plant in Missouri.  No matter where you buy Checkups treats, they were made in this plant.

What does it mean that plaque was reduced by 25% and tartar by 62%?

To obtain the prestigious Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) seal of acceptance, a study had to be performed on these treats to prove that they really did work to keep the teeth free from plaque and tartar. The study compared the amounts of plaque and tartar on the teeth of dogs who had been eating these treats compared with dogs that were not eating the treats. The VOHC has very specific guidelines for running these studies and you can learn more by visiting their website.

When the results were compared, the levels of plaque and tartar on the teeth of dogs eating the Checkups treats were significantly lower than the levels on the control dogs’ teeth. Tartar is the hardened compound that must be removed from the teeth by dental prophylaxis. Reducing the tartar on the teeth by almost 2/3 is amazing! This indicates that the regular use of these treats is going to prevent a buildup of this nasty substance. Plaque is what turns into tartar if it is not removed from the tooth in a timely manner. Reducing the plaque on the surface of the teeth by 25% corresponded with the 62% drop in tartar formation. Because plaque forms so quickly, it is impossible to reduce the plaque on the teeth as much as the tartar. That is why the numbers differ so much.

As with any statistics, it is important to look at the big picture, which is your dog’s mouth. Preventing tartar buildup on the teeth will delay time between dental cleanings in your veterinarian’s office. This saves you money and prevents your dog from having to undergo frequent anesthesia. Keeping the teeth clean also keeps your pet happier and healthier. Read more about the consequences of dental disease in our pet care articles and our other FAQ’s.

How many treats should I feed to my dog?

If your dog weighs between 20 and 25 pounds, feed 1/2 of a treat once or twice daily. You can easily divide the treat at the score line in the center of the bone. If your dog weighs more than 25 pounds, feed 1 treat once or twice daily. Make sure that your dog adequately chews the treat and does not swallow large chunks, which can lead to choking.

My Dog Likes These Treats So Much, He Ate The Entire Bag At Once. SHOULD I BE CONCERNED?

These treats are all natural and pose no risk of toxicity when consumed in large quantities. The titanium mineral may cause your dog’s feces to appear white and the glycerin may have a laxative affect leading to diarrhea. As with overconsumption of any treats, digestive upset may occur in some dogs. If vomiting becomes frequent or diarrhea develops blood, pets can become dehydrated and may require veterinary intervention.

How do these treats actually keep my dog’s teeth clean?

After many experimental formulations, the ideal combination of ingredients led to these treats. This recipe is soluble and highly digestible, making it safe for your dogs. This was an important priority, but the other priority was to make a pliable texture that would allow the teeth to sink in, effectively scraping the surfaces to remove plaque. When dogs chew the treat, they will remove existing plaque from the surface. This is important to prevent the build-up of tartar. Plaque turns into tartar when it is allowed to stay on the surface of the teeth by binding with minerals in the saliva. Mechanical action is the most important way these treats keep the teeth clean.

What are the best methods for caring for my dog’s teeth?

Brushing the teeth is the best method that you have for keeping your dog’s teeth bright and shiny. Most puppies will allow their teeth to be brushed regularly to remove plaque before it turns to tartar. Pet dental kits are available to make teeth brushing easier. Do not use your own toothpaste, because the foaming agent can cause stomach upset in your pet.

Many pet owners do not have the time for daily brushing of their dog’s teeth. An alternative to daily brushing would be a treat, like Checkups™. Checkups are pliable and completely dissolvable dental hygiene treats for your dog.

How can I help prevent dental disease throughout my dog’s life?

Dental disease is the most commonly diagnosed disorder in veterinary practices in dogs in the United States. Most will have dental disease by the time they are 2 years old. The best way to prevent your dog from developing dental disease as they get older is to formulate a program of dental care that starts when your pet is young.
Regular brushing (5-7 times per week), regular use of dental treats like Checkups*, as well as regular veterinary care, including dental exams, will help maintain good dental health.

*We do not recommend feeding Checkups to puppies less than 6 months of age or puppies or adult dogs weighing less than 20 pounds.

What should I do early on to care for my dog’s dental health?

Puppies are born with baby teeth that are replaced with permanent teeth at about 12 weeks of age. Your veterinarian should examine your puppy’s mouth at every check-up to make sure that their deciduous teeth (baby teeth) are being replaced normally. Most of the time owners do not notice when their pets lose the baby teeth because the teeth are either swallowed or lost in the environment.

If an adult tooth comes in and the baby tooth doesn’t fall out (a retained deciduous tooth) the deciduous tooth can cause problems for the health of the adult tooth. Retained deciduous teeth are commonly removed while your puppy or kitten is anesthetized for spay or neuter surgery.

What causes gingivitis?

Visible tartar on the surface of the tooth is only part of the problem. If you can see the tartar, it is also on the surface of the tooth under the gum (where you can’t see it). If the gums are red along the edge of the tooth, this is a symptom of gingivitis (inflammation of the gums). This is what starts the process of gingivitis. Gingivitis can be treated with veterinary care.

The more advanced disease called periodontitis is permanent. At this point, the structures supporting the teeth have been damaged and control is all that is possible. Prolonged dental disease makes these serious health concerns all the more likely, while increasing the chance of your pet losing teeth.

What does it mean if my dog has bad breath?

This may be a sign of dental disease. All pets have a distinct odor to their breath, affected by what they eat. This should not be a foul or offensive odor, though. If it is, there may be some underlying dental disease acting as the culprit. Look at your pet’s mouth. If you see a yellow, orange, or brownish material stuck to the surface of the teeth, you are most likely looking at tartar.

What is the best way to store my pet food?

Our foods remain freshest when stored in a cool, dry location. The food can be stored in the bag, but make sure to protect it from pests that may be attracted to the food (or hungry pets that may take an extra meal). Many customers choose to dump the food into a bin or container. This is certainly a reasonable way to store the food, but make sure to follow these simple steps:

1. Finish all of the food from one bag before adding another bag into the bin. If you have a small amount left, you can transfer it to a plastic bag so that you can proceed to step #2.
2. Wash the bin with hot, soapy water and dry thoroughly before adding a new bag of food.
3. Cut out the production code and “best before” information from the bag and tape it to the top of the bin so that if you have any questions or concerns, you can provide this information to the customer support department.
4. Store the bin in a cool, dry location. Extreme heat can cause the food to spoil and excessive moisture can lead to mold growth in the bin.

What is the big deal about dental health?

The big deal about keeping your dog’s mouth clean and healthy is the importance this plays to overall good health. The mouth contains a large blood supply that is very close to the surface. When the teeth have plaque or tartar on the surface, the gums become inflamed. This inflammation can lead to small areas of bleeding, which in turn allows the bacteria from the mouth easy access into the bloodstream. If this is happening frequently, or on a large scale, it will overwhelm the body’s ability to destroy the bacteria. These bacteria can then end up in important organs such as the heart, liver or kidneys. Infections in these critical organs can lead to one very sick dog. Permanent damage can be done to these organs, requiring expensive care throughout the life of your pet. Keep your pet’s mouth clean and you will help him stay happy and healthy.

Frequently Asked Questions

Get answers to some of our most frequently asked questions.

Where are Checkups treats made?

Checkups treats are made in our plant in Missouri.  No matter where you buy Checkups treats, they were made in this plant.

What does it mean that plaque was reduced by 25% and tartar by 62%?

To obtain the prestigious Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) seal of acceptance, a study had to be performed on these treats to prove that they really did work to keep the teeth free from plaque and tartar. The study compared the amounts of plaque and tartar on the teeth of dogs who had been eating these treats compared with dogs that were not eating the treats. The VOHC has very specific guidelines for running these studies and you can learn more by visiting their website.

When the results were compared, the levels of plaque and tartar on the teeth of dogs eating the Checkups treats were significantly lower than the levels on the control dogs’ teeth. Tartar is the hardened compound that must be removed from the teeth by dental prophylaxis. Reducing the tartar on the teeth by almost 2/3 is amazing! This indicates that the regular use of these treats is going to prevent a buildup of this nasty substance. Plaque is what turns into tartar if it is not removed from the tooth in a timely manner. Reducing the plaque on the surface of the teeth by 25% corresponded with the 62% drop in tartar formation. Because plaque forms so quickly, it is impossible to reduce the plaque on the teeth as much as the tartar. That is why the numbers differ so much.

As with any statistics, it is important to look at the big picture, which is your dog’s mouth. Preventing tartar buildup on the teeth will delay time between dental cleanings in your veterinarian’s office. This saves you money and prevents your dog from having to undergo frequent anesthesia. Keeping the teeth clean also keeps your pet happier and healthier. Read more about the consequences of dental disease in our pet care articles and our other FAQ’s.

How many treats should I feed to my dog?

If your dog weighs between 20 and 25 pounds, feed 1/2 of a treat once or twice daily. You can easily divide the treat at the score line in the center of the bone. If your dog weighs more than 25 pounds, feed 1 treat once or twice daily. Make sure that your dog adequately chews the treat and does not swallow large chunks, which can lead to choking.

My Dog Likes These Treats So Much, He Ate The Entire Bag At Once. SHOULD I BE CONCERNED?

These treats are all natural and pose no risk of toxicity when consumed in large quantities. The titanium mineral may cause your dog’s feces to appear white and the glycerin may have a laxative affect leading to diarrhea. As with overconsumption of any treats, digestive upset may occur in some dogs. If vomiting becomes frequent or diarrhea develops blood, pets can become dehydrated and may require veterinary intervention.

How do these treats actually keep my dog’s teeth clean?

After many experimental formulations, the ideal combination of ingredients led to these treats. This recipe is soluble and highly digestible, making it safe for your dogs. This was an important priority, but the other priority was to make a pliable texture that would allow the teeth to sink in, effectively scraping the surfaces to remove plaque. When dogs chew the treat, they will remove existing plaque from the surface. This is important to prevent the build-up of tartar. Plaque turns into tartar when it is allowed to stay on the surface of the teeth by binding with minerals in the saliva. Mechanical action is the most important way these treats keep the teeth clean.

What are the best methods for caring for my dog’s teeth?

Brushing the teeth is the best method that you have for keeping your dog’s teeth bright and shiny. Most puppies will allow their teeth to be brushed regularly to remove plaque before it turns to tartar. Pet dental kits are available to make teeth brushing easier. Do not use your own toothpaste, because the foaming agent can cause stomach upset in your pet.

Many pet owners do not have the time for daily brushing of their dog’s teeth. An alternative to daily brushing would be a treat, like Checkups™. Checkups are pliable and completely dissolvable dental hygiene treats for your dog.

How can I help prevent dental disease throughout my dog’s life?

Dental disease is the most commonly diagnosed disorder in veterinary practices in dogs in the United States. Most will have dental disease by the time they are 2 years old. The best way to prevent your dog from developing dental disease as they get older is to formulate a program of dental care that starts when your pet is young.
Regular brushing (5-7 times per week), regular use of dental treats like Checkups*, as well as regular veterinary care, including dental exams, will help maintain good dental health.

*We do not recommend feeding Checkups to puppies less than 6 months of age or puppies or adult dogs weighing less than 20 pounds.

What should I do early on to care for my dog’s dental health?

Puppies are born with baby teeth that are replaced with permanent teeth at about 12 weeks of age. Your veterinarian should examine your puppy’s mouth at every check-up to make sure that their deciduous teeth (baby teeth) are being replaced normally. Most of the time owners do not notice when their pets lose the baby teeth because the teeth are either swallowed or lost in the environment.

If an adult tooth comes in and the baby tooth doesn’t fall out (a retained deciduous tooth) the deciduous tooth can cause problems for the health of the adult tooth. Retained deciduous teeth are commonly removed while your puppy or kitten is anesthetized for spay or neuter surgery.

What causes gingivitis?

Visible tartar on the surface of the tooth is only part of the problem. If you can see the tartar, it is also on the surface of the tooth under the gum (where you can’t see it). If the gums are red along the edge of the tooth, this is a symptom of gingivitis (inflammation of the gums). This is what starts the process of gingivitis. Gingivitis can be treated with veterinary care.

The more advanced disease called periodontitis is permanent. At this point, the structures supporting the teeth have been damaged and control is all that is possible. Prolonged dental disease makes these serious health concerns all the more likely, while increasing the chance of your pet losing teeth.

What does it mean if my dog has bad breath?

This may be a sign of dental disease. All pets have a distinct odor to their breath, affected by what they eat. This should not be a foul or offensive odor, though. If it is, there may be some underlying dental disease acting as the culprit. Look at your pet’s mouth. If you see a yellow, orange, or brownish material stuck to the surface of the teeth, you are most likely looking at tartar.

What is the best way to store my pet food?

Our foods remain freshest when stored in a cool, dry location. The food can be stored in the bag, but make sure to protect it from pests that may be attracted to the food (or hungry pets that may take an extra meal). Many customers choose to dump the food into a bin or container. This is certainly a reasonable way to store the food, but make sure to follow these simple steps:

1. Finish all of the food from one bag before adding another bag into the bin. If you have a small amount left, you can transfer it to a plastic bag so that you can proceed to step #2.
2. Wash the bin with hot, soapy water and dry thoroughly before adding a new bag of food.
3. Cut out the production code and “best before” information from the bag and tape it to the top of the bin so that if you have any questions or concerns, you can provide this information to the customer support department.
4. Store the bin in a cool, dry location. Extreme heat can cause the food to spoil and excessive moisture can lead to mold growth in the bin.

What is the big deal about dental health?

The big deal about keeping your dog’s mouth clean and healthy is the importance this plays to overall good health. The mouth contains a large blood supply that is very close to the surface. When the teeth have plaque or tartar on the surface, the gums become inflamed. This inflammation can lead to small areas of bleeding, which in turn allows the bacteria from the mouth easy access into the bloodstream. If this is happening frequently, or on a large scale, it will overwhelm the body’s ability to destroy the bacteria. These bacteria can then end up in important organs such as the heart, liver or kidneys. Infections in these critical organs can lead to one very sick dog. Permanent damage can be done to these organs, requiring expensive care throughout the life of your pet. Keep your pet’s mouth clean and you will help him stay happy and healthy.